Get latest Camer Vibes in your inbox   Delivered by FeedBurner
November
21

Another trophy to add to his already rich collection. Cameroon’s deltasone online music virtuoso Richard Bona has won the prestigious 2012 “Grand Prix Sacem” in the Jazz category. This award crowns Richard Bona’s brilliant career and will be handed on November  26, 2012 in France. This award was created in 2006 and celebrates authors of excellent artistic works in not only music but also comedy. Richard Bona is due in Cameroon soon for concerts. This award, it must be noted, duly confirms Bona’s pertinence on the world music and jazz scene. His 7th studio album is also to be released.

 


Related Posts

September
15

Charlotte Dipanda gripped the interest of all Cameroonians with her soul-searching song ''Coucou' off her new LP ''Dube l'am'' . Even kids in the streets could chant  the lyrics of her song. She takes us to another twist ,  a mouth-watering and exquisite collaboration with internationally acclaimed bassist and vocalist Richard Bona onHow To Read A Man – Converting Like Gangbusters: #800000;”> ''Bodimbea''. Simply irresistible !

Enjoy!

zp8497586rq

Related Posts

Comments Comments Off on VIDEO: CHARLOTTE DIBANDA ft RICHARD BONA – Bodimbea
May
7

In Cameroon, the expression “diaspora-based artist” is exceedingly common. It  is so common that it echoes during some award ceremonies where special award categories have been created to celebrate diaspora-based Cameroonian artists. But the more one thinks of it the hollower it becomes. Forget Richard Bona, Charlotte Dipanda and others. Forget all these big guns whose music marches across frontiers and gets standing ovations. Let’s focus on those who are into urban music; the kind of music which should be broadcast on MTV, Trace and co. I  increasingly get the impression this expression is a misnomer. By diaspora-based artist, we expect  the artist to not only  reside in a foreign country but also do their music there. In fact, he/she should be  musically relevant there. But it is common knowledge that most of these diaspora-based artists only become artists when they want to come back home especially at Christmas and New year. These artists are musically unknown in the countries where they reside and are artists only by name. Most of these so-called diaspora-based artists only perform and become musically relevant when they come home. In the diaspora, they are more famous for every thing but their music. So, such we not rethink this label and be more selective of who is a diaspora-based artist? If diaspora-based artist means living and exercising your art first and foremost in the diaspora, then some Cameroonian artists who are so labelled  should not be nominated in this category during award ceremonies because their music,for which they are nominated, is only known and broadcast at home. Do we agree?


Related Posts

March
15

“Our radios only play foreign music.”  “Who is supposed to promote our own music” . These are extremely common statements made by well-meaning  Cameroonians and artists alike. For them, national media outlets both public and private are supposed to come to the rescue of our music. Two inferences can be made from these declarations: our music is suffering and it is kind of unpatriotic not to promote our music . It may be  true that  music from outside Cameroon receives the greatest amount of play on our airwaves but is that even a problem in itself. Okay, let’s assume it is. Is advocating and encouraging the progressive exclusion of foreign music the solution. If foreign music is omnipresent in our cultural sphere, isn’t that an indication of the weakness and paucity of our music as opposed to others. Isn’t this an indication of our artists’ inability to stay in touch with the public’s ever evanescent tastes. Let’s not forget, media organs have economic stakes in what they offer the public. And yes, let’s talk about the public. Are we no longer in a free market economy where the public/listeners/consumers determine what they want to consume. Advocating protectionism in the face of  dwindling demand for home-brewed music  is a head-in-the sand tactic. The solution to this “problem” is not reducing foreign music content and increasing  national music content. The best option, in my humble opinion, is for our artists to rise up to the challenge and compete with foreign music by producing music that the public wants. And if the State should do anything, it should provide schools to train our artists because, to the best of my knowledge, a good chunk of our artists inherit their savoir -faire from playing alongside their seniors. Very few learnt the art in formal settings yet they produce hits albeit erratically. Any call for the  protection of our music is a veiled confession to our weakness but we aren’t weak. Less I forget, the popularity of foreign music in our socio-cultural space isn’t a problem as such. It is another  tangible testament to our country’s position as a multicultural society. If other countries borrow a leave from us and start excluding foreign music (ours included) from their socio-cultural space won’t that hurt our diaspora-based artists like Richard Bona, Sally Nyolo just to name a few. Instead of advocating socio-cultural protectionism we should call on our authorities to arm our artists so they can produce competitive music. Let’s remember music as an art  form  has no frontiers. It is not a packet of biscuits that custom officers can impound. So let’s make sure ours is the best so that it’s quality and not protectionism  will enable it occupy all the spots on our billboards. Do we all agree?


Related Posts

October
6

I was on my Facebook home page and discovered this sizzling piece of music my brother shared on his wall. I was quite amazed coz I had never listened to any song from Richard Bona’s fifth album titled ”Tiki” . And guess what I discovered. The Cameroonian multi-instrumentalist , songwriter and singer featured John Legend on one of his songs titled ” Please Don’t Stop”. The  song sounds so melodious and I just can’t stop listening !

Enjoy!


Related Posts