Now that the celebrations or should we say “events” have come and gone, this should be a good time for a level-headed debate on the significance of the World Music Day in our context. In Cameroon, Sam Mbende, Ebogo Armerand and the general family of musicians provided an interesting prelude to the day with their heated disagreements over who is boss when artists’ copyright are in question. The D-day came and went with artists calling for more to be done for them. My ensuing piece shouldn’t be construed as a denigration of their concerns or demands. No such  parallel should be drawn. But with the incessant cry of Cameroonian artists echoing in our heads, it is worth asking whether the music scene in Cameroon is all about artists? Of course, no. Then why have recent actions left one with the distinct impression that when music in Cameroon is a theme then the sole if not the main stakeholders who should be given a platform for expression are musicians. I am simply trying to say that it is high time for fans a.k.a consumers of music to be part of the picture. Artists produce music in vain if no one consumes.  This implicit disregard for consumers of music is equally evident in the kind of music some artists put on the market. Their songs show that they don’t include consumers’ taste in their considerations when they are working on an album. This disregard impacts them negatively as upon release their albums receive a cold shoulder from the fans who ravenously consume the music that appeals to them. If we want to change the situation then this what we should do. We should henceforth endeavour to integrate fans in the debates because although they may be part of the problem through piracy, they can be part of the solution if their  concerns are considered. Are we together?


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