Samuel Eto'o has once again made his way into the headlines. After a meeting with the Prime Minister along side the head coach and team manager, the Anzhi frontman has ended his boycott of the Indomitable Lions and can be counted on for the do- or- die match against Cape Verde in Yaounde. While his imminent return has been greeted by a  groundswell of  hope and enthusiasm , for some it has triggered some troubling questions. One is whether his return and the surrounding circumstances aren't going to resurrect old demons. In return years, the Lions were plagued by what can be called the Eto'o dependence syndrome, with some players resenting Eto'o's  huge , some say overbearing,  role in the team. Is his return, after intervention fro

m high State authorities not going be to be as unsettling as before? Given the context, his return can be interpreted as the transformation of the Eto'o dependence syndrome into the Eto'o idolisation, a worse form of the troubling Eto'o dependance syndrome. This leads to another issue: can and should an entire nation cast all its hopes on the shoulders of one man ( It is another feather on his already – crowded cap but what does it say of the country and its values generally)? Let's remember that his return is no guarantee that we will slot three goals with no response from the modest but lethal Cape -Verdians. The urgency with which State authorities have hurried to lure the errant Lion back into the pride seems to suggest the team will undoubtedly sink without him – is that true? These are just questions but they seem to once again betray our love for palliative and not curative solutions in the face of  a well-known  opponent like non-qualification. Below is a copy of Eto'o's letter to say he will return to the national team.


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